Seth Koko comes out of his silence nine years later

Seth Koko comes out of his silence nine years later

After 9 years of observing the Ouattara regime, Seth Koko reappears on Friday March 27, 2020 in what he called his rant. Expert, consultant in lobbying diplomacy, Author of the Inter-Ivorian Dialogue project under the regime of Laurent Gbagbo, Seth KOKO had approached President Ouattara following the action of his association ACSCI (Citizen Alliance of Ivorian Civil Society) who had supported the accession of Alassane Ouattara to power in 2010. Returning to the country since 2014, he practices in the private sector with his French cabinet, Ambassador Investis, a firm of international lobbying and investment advice. This firm, which also promotes entrepreneurial excellence, is the promoter of the Ivory Builders Gala (annual gala of distinction for business leaders) and the Ivory Builders Forum. After nine years of observing the governance of the RHDP, Seth Koko Very rebelled against power Ouattara puts on his coat of civil society leader and comes out of his silence in this message posted on his facebook account.

I can no longer remain silent in the face of this growing injustice against the people of my country. I can no longer bear this betrayal that the government is making to the Ivorian population. I can also no longer remain indifferent to the categorization of Ivorians regardless of the prevailing situation. From 2009 to 2011, I stood out on the scene as a civil society leader in the defense of the rights of populations because I cannot stand injustice. Ten years later, I see an exacerbating injustice in my country. I was silent, hoping that President Ouattara would be a real solution as he boasted during his election campaign. I hoped that he would respect our constitution, democracy, equal opportunities and the Ivorian. For almost 6 years since I returned to my country, I have the impression that the head of state directs a people he does not like or that he does not know enough … One of his serious errors was to deport his brothers, his fellow citizens to the ICC, others to Ivorian prisons and subsequently to seal the CDVR report; a report which however cost us 16 billion CFA. He had just prevented a real reconciliation of his people who look at each other until today like an earthenware dog. The other serious mistake is the current mismanagement of the Coronavirus crisis; this pandemic that risks sweeping us all away while the government shows signs of ineffectiveness. Our government with its dizzying growth figures and whose country security index is sometimes compared to that of London or Switzerland, should disburse a substantial sum as these powers do, and take measures adapted to our local realities in the face of this pandemic. The country should also be provided with appropriate health services to cope with natural disasters … Unfortunately this is not the case. We are told about 95.880 billion announced as usual and the head of state did not specify the expenditure items of the amount indicated.

Faced with all this, should we be the Stoic? That is to say abstain and continue to support Well no, because since then, our Ivory Coast has given the image of a cow dung. Reconciliation failed, and our development program was operated on very weak foundations. The proof, faced with Coronavirus, I see that our government is running out of steam, and our health system is already showing its limits. Today, Côte d’Ivoire needs a true and sincere reconciliation between her sons and daughters to facilitate work and sustainable development. Ivory Coast does not deserve this facade and clan reconciliation that we see today. Ivorians also do not deserve to be tampered with their constitution and electoral code by ordinance. We are intellectual enough to tell the difference between democracy and dictatorship. No bridge, no asphalt road, no metro and no hotel can seal the reconciliation of a people. The people need respect for their rights, solidarity and unity to develop. Normally a wise, humanist and reconciling father always benefits from the respect of his orientations by the members of his family; except in our case, what are we witnessing today in this Ivory Coast?… I will come back soon to the 9 years of governance and the question of the emergence that has been promised to us… ”Civil society must wake up to avoid repeating the same mistakes. “Concluded him himself that the leaders of Ivorian civil society affectionately call the father of cyber activism for having been the first to launch this activated in 2009 at the start of Facebook in French-speaking Africa.

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